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Cuba condemns Trump's "racist" statements on Haiti, El Salvador

14 Janvier 2018

The statement, issued late Friday after the African ambassadors held an emergency meeting, comes amid an worldwide outcry over Trump reportedly saying he'd rather have more immigrants from Norway and fewer from Haiti and "shithole countries" in Africa. Diallo is the most senior USA diplomat in Haiti, where residents on Friday marked the eighth anniversary of a 7.1-magnitude quake that killed at least 220,000 people.

"Yesterday Senator Durbin and I met with President Trump at the White House to discuss our bipartisan proposal on border security and immigration".

Africans reacted angrily Friday after Donald Trump reportedly referred to their nations as "shithole countries", with many lashing the USA president for racism and ignorance.

The United Nations human rights office said it had no doubt Trump's remarks were "racist", while the Vatican newspaper branded them as "particularly harsh and offensive".

Trump's comments were "shocking and shameful" and "I'm sorry, but there's no other word one can use but racist", said a spokesman for the United Nations human rights office, Rupert Colville.

Trump also denied saying "anything derogatory about Haitians other than Haiti is, obviously, a very poor and troubled country".

On Friday, Sen. Richard Durbin (D-Ill.), who was in the meeting where Trump referred to "shithole countries", said Trump made the "hate-filled, vile, and racist" remarks that have been attributed to him. King's memory is marked with a national holiday, which falls this year on Monday. Durbin thought it would just be the senators and Trump in the room.

A routine annual affair for every United States president, Trump's medical checkup is being widely reported and has drawn media attention in view of his political opponents raising questions about his health.

In a series of tweets on Friday, Trump also suggested that momentum toward a deal on maintaining such protection had stalled.

As for Africa, he asked why more people from "s-thole countries" should be allowed into the US, the sources said.

Prominent Kenyan commentator Patrick Gathara, said that Trump's words were nothing new from a "racist and ignorant" administration, nor from the West at large.

The African Union has also said it was alarmed by President Trump's vulgar statement.

Botswana's foreign ministry summoned the USA ambassador in protest and called the comments "highly irresponsible, reprehensible and racist".

Linguistics Professor John McWhorter of Columbia University told CNN's Don Lemon Friday that there was no way to take what Trump said about "sh*thole countries" as anything but racist.

On social media, users across the continent on Friday posted images of modern skylines and handsome nature from their countries with the ironic hashtag "shithole". Whether folks are coming from Australia or England or Haiti or Senegal, when they come to the United States, they adopt American values and they make our country stronger.

"These are shocking and shameful comments from the President of the United States".

"I don't think the Present Trump is a racist in the traditional sense as we know in this country", Farris Jr. said. The White House did not deny his remark but issued a statement saying Trump supports immigration policies that welcome "those who can contribute to our society".

Ben Marter, a spokesman for Durbin, did not provide details of the conversation but said the senator was "encouraged" by Trump's reaction.

"We have seven days and the clock is ticking".

After that, if there is no deal, Dreamers are in jeopardy - of deportation at some point and, of more immediate concern, the ability to work legally in the U.S.

Federal agencies will run out of money and have to shut down if lawmakers don't pass legislation extending their financing by January 19.

Cuba condemns Trump's