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Trump Says US-Russia Ties 'Worse Now' than During Cold War

14 Avril 2018

Trump tempered those remarks on Thursday and even as he consulted allies such and Britain and France, who could join in any US -led strikes on Syria, there were signs of efforts to prevent the crisis from spiraling out of control.

This is a real concern on both sides, with fear of a U.S. strike on Syria escalating out of control said to be a major reason why the administration is shifting away from a strike.

Moscow took the step after the US, France, Germany and United Kingdom held consultations on launching a military strike as early as the end of this week. France is already involved in the USA -led coalition created in 2014 to fight the Islamic State group in Syria and Iraq.

The Syrian government and Russian Federation, a close ally of the Bashar Assad regime, have denied a chemical attack occurred.

President Emmanuel Macron said France, the USA and Britain will decide how to respond in the coming days. "This massacre was a significant escalation in a pattern of chemical weapons use by that very awful regime".

Trump warned on Wednesday that missiles "will be coming" in response to the Douma incident. "But the United States administration is giving alarmingly contradictory signals", he said. He said "the Cold War is back - with a vengeance but with a difference", because safeguards that managed the risk of escalation in the past, "no longer seem to be present".

Trump appeared to be taunting Russian Federation with American firepower he believes is superior. "Trump is going to go to war with Russia to prove he's not a Russian agent".

Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said any U.S. missile strike could be an attempt to destroy evidence of the reported chemical weapons attack in the Syrian town of Douma, for which Damascus and Moscow have denied any responsibility. Vice President Mike Pence will travel in Trump's place.

He is troubled by the similarly gruesome pictures of suffocating children, but his tougher stance this time is driven in part by his hardened view of Putin and his belief that Assad did not learn a lesson from the first strike, officials said.

Trump's language was more brutal: "They are crimes of a monster".

World Health Organization did not confirm that a chemical weapons attack took place.

A French frigate, UK Royal Navy submarines laden with cruise missiles and the USS Donald Cook, an American destroyer equipped with Tomahawk land attack missiles, have all moved into range of Syria's sun-bleached coast.

"A fake "chemical weapons massacre" was a last attempt to stage a provocation for the benefit of extremists and their foreign backers", the embassy tweeted.

In the United Kingdom, cabinet ministers agreed that it was "highly likely" the Assad regime was responsible for the alleged attack and said the use of chemical weapons must not "go unchallenged".

"500 people were poisoned in Syrian 'chemical attack".

Bolton and the other participants were surprised when Vice President Mike Pence showed up unannounced and took over a Principals' Committee meeting on Syria on Monday afternoon.

"We know that there are only certain countries like Syria that have delivery mechanisms and have those types of weapons". He pointed to the Assad regime as the likely perpetrator. But the next morning, Trump tweeted that he "never said when an attack on Syria would take place".

Although he didn't provide the evidence, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said the Kremlin has "irrefutable data" that the attack in Douma, that killed at least 75 people, was staged. The resolution was likely to be vetoed by Syrian ally Russian Federation.

Britain's UN Ambassador Karen Pierce called the spokesman's remarks "grotesque" and "a blatant lie".

'You don't see things like that as bad as the news is around the world. "I do not rule out that. we will have to weigh all aspects of our cooperation with the United States", Medvedev said.

This time, the New York Times claims that videos, flight records compiled by citizens and interviews with locals and rescue workers suggest pro-government forces dropped the chemical compound during a military push to break the will of Douma's rebels.

Last month, Britain blamed Russian Federation for a nerve agent attack on an ex-spy and his daughter, accusations Russian Federation has vehemently denied.

At another point, Trump blamed the bad relationship on Special Counsel Robert Mueller and his investigation into links between the Trump campaign and Russians who sought to influence the 2016 presidential election through hacks and fake news.

Germany joined the chorus of European countries saying that it believed the attack involved chemical weapons and called for action.

Poznikhir also repeated Moscow's earlier allegations that claims of the attack were "fake" and said the Russian military is ready to ensure security for experts from the worldwide chemical weapons watchdog who are to visit Douma to investigate.

Trump Says US-Russia Ties 'Worse Now' than During Cold War